Reviews

2017 Infiniti Q60

The 2017 Infiniti Q60 is new for 2017 after taking a year off.

The two-door returns with a similar powertrain and trim lineup as the Q50 sedan from which it’s based. There’s a base 2.0t model, then up to a 2.0t Premium trim with more creature comforts. Adding more content requires a bigger engine (not that we’re complaining), so 3.0t Premium models and Red Sport get Infiniti’s new twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter V-6 in different states of tune to extract more horsepower at the top. Optional all-wheel drive can be added at every step along the way.

The Q60 earns a 7.6 overall on our ratings scale thanks to its good looks and quality interior materials. Performance may not be the biggest draw to this coupe, despite its heady horsepower numbers, but that’s no dig—it’s a very comfortable cruiser. (Read more about how we rate cars.)

Styling and performance

The Infiniti Q60 benefits from new sheet metal all the way around to bring Infiniti’s new flagship coupe into our good graces again. Yes, there’s a pinch on the hood that results from two lines coming from the ground, extending through the badge, and finishing on the nose. No, we can’t even either.

Beyond eccentricities, the coupe’s gorgeous profile and organic lines signal a great start from the automaker. Coupes are inherently good-looking to us, but this one just looks great.

Inside, the Q60 does its best to deliver on the promise the exterior makes on the outside, and for the most part, it succeeds. In top trims, the interior can be decked with white or red shades of leather that look sharp. Please take off your shoes before getting into the car. Thanks so much.

Under the hood, the Q60 sports a trio of turbocharged tools, each designed with a specific task.

The base 2.0-liter turbo-4 makes 208 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque. It’s 7.3-second run up to 60 mph isn’t something to scoff at, but it’s available to get all those good looks at just under $40,000.

Stepping up to 3.0t models nets the newest V-6 to the Infiniti family, a relative of the hyper-fast V-6 found in the Nissan GT-R. The 3.0-liter turbo-6 model here makes 300 hp and 295 lb-ft and may just be the sweet spot before jumping up to the Red Sport. (We’ll report back once we’ve driven that model.)

The top Red Sport trim takes the same 3.0-liter V-6 and force feeds it to 400 hp and 350 lb-ft—and adds one more cooling water pump than 3.0t models have—and it’s good enough for 5 second runs up to 60 mph in all-wheel-drive configuration. Every version comes equipped with a 7-speed automatic that has its faults, but ultimately falls in line.

We’ll have to stop one degree short of calling the Red Sport a super performance coupe—in line with BMW’s M4 or Mercedes’ C63—only because the engine is all-too eager to make promises that the running gear just can’t cash yet. The steering and handling are up to the task, but the brakes and tires? We’re not convinced.

Most configurations of the Q60 will manage 25 mpg combined, which is respectable, if not class-leading.

Comfort, safety, and features

The Q60 comes into its own when its taken off the ledge and dialed into a long drive. The interior is incredibly quiet and composed, Bose’s latest premium audio system is all-too eager to serve up tasty jazz notes using new sound compression software. Coltrane on Spotify never sounded so good.

Driver and passenger get the best seats in the house, rear passengers are fine in a pinch—did I mention the part about the shoes coming off?

Neither major U.S. safety rating agency has delivered a safety rating, and we’re not holding our breath for one either; the last generation Q60 wasn’t rated by either agency.

Base coupes are handsomely equipped with features you’d expect from a coupe that starts a short jump away from $40,000. The Infiniti Q60 comes standard with 19-inch wheels, LED headlights, keyless ignition, leatherette (vinyl) seating, power adjustable front seats, leather-wrapped steering wheel, dual touchscreens for infotainment and car settings, Bluetooth streaming, and a rearview camera.

Top-of-the-line examples include advanced safety equipment such as forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking, adaptive cruise control, and active lane control, and approach nearly $60,000 for the opportunity.

All-wheel drive is available on every trim for an additional $2,000, but don’t hold out for a convertible version—we hear it’s not in the cards.